Category Archives: Sports

Denver Nuggets vs Golden State Warriors Live

Denver Nuggets vs Golden State Warriors Live

Alec Nathan
April 11, 2014

USA Today

The Golden State Warriors (48-30) failed to clinch a playoff spot on Thursday night in a thrilling 100-99 loss to the Denver Nuggets (35-44).

After Stephen Curry delivered a go-ahead layup with 4.7 seconds remaining in regulation to put the Warriors up one, Nuggets forward Kenneth Faried converted a difficult turnaround jump shot over Draymond Green with 0.5 seconds remaining to ice things.

On the second night of a back-to-back, Timofey Mozgov stole the show, tying his career-high with 23 points while setting a new career-high with 29 rebounds (nine offensive). The 29 rebounds were also the most one player has recorded in a single game this season. He added three blocks and three assists to his final line, as well.

Faried added a double-double consisting of 18 points and 17 rebounds (eight offensive) on a night when the Nuggets out-rebounded the Warriors, 63-38.

Randy Foye chipped in 20 points on 7-of-23 shooting (4-of-13 from three), seven assists and seven rebounds while Evan Fournier scored nine points off the bench.

All told, the Nuggets shot 38 percent from the field and 29 percent from three but were aided by 25 offensive rebounds, which led to a plethora of second-chance opporunities.

Curry led the Warriors with 24 points, seven rebounds and a team-high six assists, but shot just 8-of-19 from the field and 2-of-7 from three in the loss.

Klay Thompson poured in 21 points (8-of-19 shooting) while Jermaine O’Neal added 12 points and five boards off the bench.

Next up for the Warriors is a matchup with the Los Angeles Lakers on Friday while the Nuggets will square off against the Utah Jazz on Saturday.

 

FIBA AmeriCup 2017: Uruguay vs. U.S live

FIBA AmeriCup 2017: Uruguay vs. U.S live

Even with a few new additions to the roster, SmackDown Live successfully leans on its familiar talent.
Kyle Fowle
by Kyle Fowle
Aug 23, 2017
Aug 23, 2017
3
513views

1shares

Coming off of a very disappointing SummerSlam, it looked like both Raw and SmackDown Live were in tough spots. Both shows had failed to tell truly compelling stories at one of the biggest PPVs of the year, and all signs pointed to them struggling to find that momentum again. Well, just last night Monday Night Raw proved that it could immediately hit the reset button and offer plenty of interesting, fresh material. Thus, the question that lingered was whether or not SmackDown Live could do the same. Luckily, this week’s show lays any doubts to rest, delivering a solid show from top to bottom.
The past matters on SmackDown Live

What’s fascinating to look at is how both Raw and SmackDown Live approach their reboot after SummerSlam. While both shows seemed to be in the same boat as of Sunday night, this week’s episodes suggest that SmackDown Live was in better shape all along. What I mean is that this week’s Raw essentially had to reset everything (minus the Brock-Strowman feud) in order to right the ship. Fresh matchups, and completely moving on from past feuds, contributed to the success of the show.

In contrast to that approach, SmackDown Live doesn’t really hit that reset button at all. Instead, the Blue Brand builds off of SummerSlam‘s controversial and sometimes convoluted outcomes. Rather than ignore everything that happened they lean into the skid, using the underwhelming portions of Sunday’s card to find new ways forward for many feuds. And really, that’s exactly what you want when it comes to WWE’s brand of professional wrestling. This is a show that runs 52 weeks and year and is constantly changing. The ability to assess and examine your previous stories and move forward in new and exciting ways is integral to the product. It sounds simple, but more often than not WWE takes the amnesia approach, discarding past feuds in order to make the new ones work.
Can’t get enough of Styles vs. Owens

That focus on building stories based on recent events is evident as the show gets underway, with Styles out to celebrate his big United States Championship win. He doesn’t revel in the victory for long though, and that’s because AJ Styles is all about matches and performance. So, he instantly reinstates the Open Challenge. That’s an immediate shift in the story, but it isn’t long before Kevin Owens comes out demanding another match because Shane McMahon screwed him at SummerSlam.

While having Owens and Styles lock horns again has the potential for complacency, there’s value in continually upping the ante. So Styles agrees to the match, and in order for the stakes to be set a little higher, Owens gets to choose his own referee and, as Shane stipulates, this will be Owens’ last opportunity at the title. If he loses there’s no rematch, no more whining, and no more special guest referees. That adds a sense of urgency to the main event, and also provides a good storytelling device to fill out the show.
Sami Zayn, special guest referee?

That device is Kevin Owens looking for a ref. Initially, he goes to Sami Zayn, saying that while they’ve had their differences he’s the only guy he can trust. It’s sweet and endearing, but of course, Owens can’t stop there. He always goes one step too far, and this time he condescends to Zayn, and it costs him a ref. That then leads him to a willing Breezeango that he doesn’t want any part of before Baron Corbin steps up and takes the job. All he wants in return is the first shot at the title should Owens win. It’s simple, effective storytelling that does a lot more for these characters and this feud than some run-of-the-mill backstage interview.

And make no mistake, Owens and Styles are the beating heart of this show. There’s other good stuff going on—The Usos have been at the top of their game for a ridiculously long time—but it’s Owens and Styles keeping things lively. I mean, their segments open and close the show, and all the WWE Champion gets is a Kinshasa to the face. Argue all you want about whether Jinder’s reign “devalues” the WWE Championship, but there’s no argument to be made that other guys on the roster are being ignored in favour of the champ. SmackDown Live knows what their draw is, and they’re leaning on it hard.
Bobby Roode and Shelton Benjamin are in the house

Of course, much like Raw, SmackDown Live isn’t simply shifting its focus to accommodate for what happened at SummerSlam. It’s also introducing new talent to the roster and looking to ignite new feuds. For many, Bobby Roode making his SmackDown Live debut will be the highlight of the night, and understandably so. Roode’s done great character work down in NXT—I remain mostly indifferent to much of his in-ring work, and his NXT Championship matches haven’t done much for me—and he feels like a natural fit on the Blue show.

For me though, the most exciting addition is Shelton Benjamin. He’s promised as Chad Gable’s tag team partner, and his debut is set for next week. Benjamin is exactly the kind of dynamic talent that can play an important role throughout the roster. Want him to be the veteran tag partner for a young up-and-comer? Done. Want him to fill out a midcard feud? Done. Want him to join a Money In The Bank ladder match and compete as a true, believable contender for the briefcase? Done. Benjamin is versatile, and I can’t wait to see what SmackDown Live does with him.

As much as the injection of new talent is a welcome sight, the relative success of this week’s show is the promise represented by the talent already here. Carmella and Natalya are in an interesting spot, essentially feuding while also remaining aligned based on being heels. That adds a few wrinkles to the story of the lingering cash-in. Owens taking the loss in his final shot at the United States Championship should only enrage an already livid Owens, and that’s never a bad thing. Then there’s Nakamura, coming off his SummerSlam loss and instantly reasserting himself as the rightful contender to the WWE Championship.

SummerSlam may have been disappointing, but SmackDown Live is putting the pieces back together, and things are already starting to look up.
Quick Hits:

You have to love Owens using Shane McMahon’s legitimate helicopter crash as a way to fuel his conspiracy theory that he got robbed at SummerSlam.
So Dolph Ziggler is back, which begs the question: Dolph Ziggler was gone?
The fact that the Singh Brothers announce Jinder Mahal’s arrival backstage as well is a nice touch. We should all have such loyal, passionate associates.
Now we have an answer to the question, who can pull off wearing a RompHim? Turns out it’s Fandango and Tyler Breeze.
It’s been a long four days, but guess what everyone? We’re finally out of Brooklyn and far away from that crowd.

Results:

Bobby Roode defeated Aiden English; The Usos defeated The Hype Bros; Shinsuke Nakamura defeated The Singh Brothers (2-on-1 Handicap match); Naomi and Becky Lynch defeated Natalya and Carmella; AJ Styles (c) defeated Kevin Owens (United States Championship match).

Race Night live

Race Night live

Even with a few new additions to the roster, SmackDown Live successfully leans on its familiar talent.
Kyle Fowle
by Kyle Fowle
Aug 23, 2017
Aug 23, 2017
3
513views

1shares

Coming off of a very disappointing SummerSlam, it looked like both Raw and SmackDown Live were in tough spots. Both shows had failed to tell truly compelling stories at one of the biggest PPVs of the year, and all signs pointed to them struggling to find that momentum again. Well, just last night Monday Night Raw proved that it could immediately hit the reset button and offer plenty of interesting, fresh material. Thus, the question that lingered was whether or not SmackDown Live could do the same. Luckily, this week’s show lays any doubts to rest, delivering a solid show from top to bottom.
The past matters on SmackDown Live

What’s fascinating to look at is how both Raw and SmackDown Live approach their reboot after SummerSlam. While both shows seemed to be in the same boat as of Sunday night, this week’s episodes suggest that SmackDown Live was in better shape all along. What I mean is that this week’s Raw essentially had to reset everything (minus the Brock-Strowman feud) in order to right the ship. Fresh matchups, and completely moving on from past feuds, contributed to the success of the show.

In contrast to that approach, SmackDown Live doesn’t really hit that reset button at all. Instead, the Blue Brand builds off of SummerSlam‘s controversial and sometimes convoluted outcomes. Rather than ignore everything that happened they lean into the skid, using the underwhelming portions of Sunday’s card to find new ways forward for many feuds. And really, that’s exactly what you want when it comes to WWE’s brand of professional wrestling. This is a show that runs 52 weeks and year and is constantly changing. The ability to assess and examine your previous stories and move forward in new and exciting ways is integral to the product. It sounds simple, but more often than not WWE takes the amnesia approach, discarding past feuds in order to make the new ones work.
Can’t get enough of Styles vs. Owens

That focus on building stories based on recent events is evident as the show gets underway, with Styles out to celebrate his big United States Championship win. He doesn’t revel in the victory for long though, and that’s because AJ Styles is all about matches and performance. So, he instantly reinstates the Open Challenge. That’s an immediate shift in the story, but it isn’t long before Kevin Owens comes out demanding another match because Shane McMahon screwed him at SummerSlam.

While having Owens and Styles lock horns again has the potential for complacency, there’s value in continually upping the ante. So Styles agrees to the match, and in order for the stakes to be set a little higher, Owens gets to choose his own referee and, as Shane stipulates, this will be Owens’ last opportunity at the title. If he loses there’s no rematch, no more whining, and no more special guest referees. That adds a sense of urgency to the main event, and also provides a good storytelling device to fill out the show.
Sami Zayn, special guest referee?

That device is Kevin Owens looking for a ref. Initially, he goes to Sami Zayn, saying that while they’ve had their differences he’s the only guy he can trust. It’s sweet and endearing, but of course, Owens can’t stop there. He always goes one step too far, and this time he condescends to Zayn, and it costs him a ref. That then leads him to a willing Breezeango that he doesn’t want any part of before Baron Corbin steps up and takes the job. All he wants in return is the first shot at the title should Owens win. It’s simple, effective storytelling that does a lot more for these characters and this feud than some run-of-the-mill backstage interview.

And make no mistake, Owens and Styles are the beating heart of this show. There’s other good stuff going on—The Usos have been at the top of their game for a ridiculously long time—but it’s Owens and Styles keeping things lively. I mean, their segments open and close the show, and all the WWE Champion gets is a Kinshasa to the face. Argue all you want about whether Jinder’s reign “devalues” the WWE Championship, but there’s no argument to be made that other guys on the roster are being ignored in favour of the champ. SmackDown Live knows what their draw is, and they’re leaning on it hard.
Bobby Roode and Shelton Benjamin are in the house

Of course, much like Raw, SmackDown Live isn’t simply shifting its focus to accommodate for what happened at SummerSlam. It’s also introducing new talent to the roster and looking to ignite new feuds. For many, Bobby Roode making his SmackDown Live debut will be the highlight of the night, and understandably so. Roode’s done great character work down in NXT—I remain mostly indifferent to much of his in-ring work, and his NXT Championship matches haven’t done much for me—and he feels like a natural fit on the Blue show.

For me though, the most exciting addition is Shelton Benjamin. He’s promised as Chad Gable’s tag team partner, and his debut is set for next week. Benjamin is exactly the kind of dynamic talent that can play an important role throughout the roster. Want him to be the veteran tag partner for a young up-and-comer? Done. Want him to fill out a midcard feud? Done. Want him to join a Money In The Bank ladder match and compete as a true, believable contender for the briefcase? Done. Benjamin is versatile, and I can’t wait to see what SmackDown Live does with him.

As much as the injection of new talent is a welcome sight, the relative success of this week’s show is the promise represented by the talent already here. Carmella and Natalya are in an interesting spot, essentially feuding while also remaining aligned based on being heels. That adds a few wrinkles to the story of the lingering cash-in. Owens taking the loss in his final shot at the United States Championship should only enrage an already livid Owens, and that’s never a bad thing. Then there’s Nakamura, coming off his SummerSlam loss and instantly reasserting himself as the rightful contender to the WWE Championship.

SummerSlam may have been disappointing, but SmackDown Live is putting the pieces back together, and things are already starting to look up.
Quick Hits:

You have to love Owens using Shane McMahon’s legitimate helicopter crash as a way to fuel his conspiracy theory that he got robbed at SummerSlam.
So Dolph Ziggler is back, which begs the question: Dolph Ziggler was gone?
The fact that the Singh Brothers announce Jinder Mahal’s arrival backstage as well is a nice touch. We should all have such loyal, passionate associates.
Now we have an answer to the question, who can pull off wearing a RompHim? Turns out it’s Fandango and Tyler Breeze.
It’s been a long four days, but guess what everyone? We’re finally out of Brooklyn and far away from that crowd.

Results:

Bobby Roode defeated Aiden English; The Usos defeated The Hype Bros; Shinsuke Nakamura defeated The Singh Brothers (2-on-1 Handicap match); Naomi and Becky Lynch defeated Natalya and Carmella; AJ Styles (c) defeated Kevin Owens (United States Championship match).

U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play live

U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play live

0 Braden Keith | May 01st, 2017 | Brazilian Volleyball, International Volleyball, News, NORCECA volleyball, South American Volleyball, U.S. Women’s Volleyball
U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play

Kim Hill (#15) and Team USA will welcome Brazil to Anaheim in August for a two-game exhibition in the USA Volleyball Cup. Archive Photo via FIVB
Report Ad
More News
FIVB Girls’ U18 Worlds’ Dream Team and Statistical Leaders Announced
Australia Steps Up Anti-Doping Efforts For 2018 Commonwealth Games
Stanford 6’8″ Opposite Merete Lutz Misses Opening Weekend With Injury
Stanford Reclaims the Top Spot; VolleyMob Week 2 Top 25 Poll
Report Ad

Share U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play on Facebook
Tweet U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play
Submit U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play to Reddit
Share U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play on Pinterest
Share U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play on LinkedIn
Share U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play on Google+

Report Ad

The U.S. National Women’s Volleyball Team has followed the men’s program in announcing that they will welcome in Brazil this summer to play in the 2017 USA Volleyball Cup from August 27th-29th. The women’s teams will play in Anaheim a week after the American men welcome Brazil to Hoffman Estates, Illinois.

The United States is currently ranked #2 in the FIVB World Rankings, with Brazil sitting #4. The Americans took a bronze medal at the 2016 Olympic Games, while Brazil lost to eventual champions China in the quarterfinals in Rio.

“Brazil has built one of a handful of legendary programs in international volleyball, and this year’s USA Volleyball Cup matches will be a wonderful opportunity for American fans to see both programs live,” U.S. Women’s National Team Head Coach Karch Kiraly said. “Every time we square off across the net, it’s a battle – both teams test each other, and learn, and we cherish experiences like that. We’ll see you in August!”

The USA Volleyball Cup opening match will have first serve at 4 p.m. PT on Aug. 27, while the Aug. 29 match will start at 7:30 p.m. PT.

“Anaheim and the greater hospitality community is looking forward to welcoming Brazil to the heart of Southern California,” Sports Anaheim Vice President of Sports Development Roy Edmondson said. “The City of Anaheim is proud to watch two of the most prestigious women’s volleyball nations face head-to-head in the U.S. Women’s National Team’s home city, Anaheim.”

The two teams have played 24 times since 2011, with the Americans having a 14-10 advantage in that period. 6 of those matches have been in tournament gold medal m atches. Over a longer period, since 1983, Brazil has a decided advantage, leading 67-74.

After the USA Volleyball Cup, both teams will participate in the FIVB Grand Champions Cup in Japan from September 5th-10th, along with China, Russia, Japan, and South Korea.

The Grand Champions Cup is the summer’s primary global women’s championship at the senior level. The two teams will also face off at least once in the FIVB World Grand Prix in July – they’re scheduled to close pool play on July 23rd in Brazil.

This will be 4th edition of the women’s USA Volleyball Cup, which has been held every year since 2013, aside from last year (due to Olympic obligations). Brazil participated in the 2014 edition as well, with the Americans sweeping the series 4-0 with two games in Southern California and 2 games in Hawaii.

Americans’ official training start date is Monday, with some players reporting sooner or later based on their professional team schedules.

U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play live

U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play live

0 Braden Keith | May 01st, 2017 | Brazilian Volleyball, International Volleyball, News, NORCECA volleyball, South American Volleyball, U.S. Women’s Volleyball
U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play

Kim Hill (#15) and Team USA will welcome Brazil to Anaheim in August for a two-game exhibition in the USA Volleyball Cup. Archive Photo via FIVB
Report Ad
More News
FIVB Girls’ U18 Worlds’ Dream Team and Statistical Leaders Announced
Australia Steps Up Anti-Doping Efforts For 2018 Commonwealth Games
Stanford 6’8″ Opposite Merete Lutz Misses Opening Weekend With Injury
Stanford Reclaims the Top Spot; VolleyMob Week 2 Top 25 Poll
Report Ad

Share U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play on Facebook
Tweet U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play
Submit U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play to Reddit
Share U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play on Pinterest
Share U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play on LinkedIn
Share U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play on Google+

Report Ad

The U.S. National Women’s Volleyball Team has followed the men’s program in announcing that they will welcome in Brazil this summer to play in the 2017 USA Volleyball Cup from August 27th-29th. The women’s teams will play in Anaheim a week after the American men welcome Brazil to Hoffman Estates, Illinois.

The United States is currently ranked #2 in the FIVB World Rankings, with Brazil sitting #4. The Americans took a bronze medal at the 2016 Olympic Games, while Brazil lost to eventual champions China in the quarterfinals in Rio.

“Brazil has built one of a handful of legendary programs in international volleyball, and this year’s USA Volleyball Cup matches will be a wonderful opportunity for American fans to see both programs live,” U.S. Women’s National Team Head Coach Karch Kiraly said. “Every time we square off across the net, it’s a battle – both teams test each other, and learn, and we cherish experiences like that. We’ll see you in August!”

The USA Volleyball Cup opening match will have first serve at 4 p.m. PT on Aug. 27, while the Aug. 29 match will start at 7:30 p.m. PT.

“Anaheim and the greater hospitality community is looking forward to welcoming Brazil to the heart of Southern California,” Sports Anaheim Vice President of Sports Development Roy Edmondson said. “The City of Anaheim is proud to watch two of the most prestigious women’s volleyball nations face head-to-head in the U.S. Women’s National Team’s home city, Anaheim.”

The two teams have played 24 times since 2011, with the Americans having a 14-10 advantage in that period. 6 of those matches have been in tournament gold medal m atches. Over a longer period, since 1983, Brazil has a decided advantage, leading 67-74.

After the USA Volleyball Cup, both teams will participate in the FIVB Grand Champions Cup in Japan from September 5th-10th, along with China, Russia, Japan, and South Korea.

The Grand Champions Cup is the summer’s primary global women’s championship at the senior level. The two teams will also face off at least once in the FIVB World Grand Prix in July – they’re scheduled to close pool play on July 23rd in Brazil.

This will be 4th edition of the women’s USA Volleyball Cup, which has been held every year since 2013, aside from last year (due to Olympic obligations). Brazil participated in the 2014 edition as well, with the Americans sweeping the series 4-0 with two games in Southern California and 2 games in Hawaii.

Americans’ official training start date is Monday, with some players reporting sooner or later based on their professional team schedules.

Television Games live

Television Games live

0 Braden Keith | May 01st, 2017 | Brazilian Volleyball, International Volleyball, News, NORCECA volleyball, South American Volleyball, U.S. Women’s Volleyball
Television Games

Kim Hill (#15) and Team USA will welcome Brazil to Anaheim in August for a two-game exhibition in the USA Volleyball Cup. Archive Photo via FIVB
Report Ad
More News
FIVB Girls’ U18 Worlds’ Dream Team and Statistical Leaders Announced
Australia Steps Up Anti-Doping Efforts For 2018 Commonwealth Games
Stanford 6’8″ Opposite Merete Lutz Misses Opening Weekend With Injury
Stanford Reclaims the Top Spot; VolleyMob Week 2 Top 25 Poll
Report Ad

Share Television Games on Facebook
Tweet Television Games
Submit Television Games to Reddit
Share Television Games on Pinterest
Share Television Games on LinkedIn
Share Television Games on Google+

Report Ad

The U.S. National Women’s Volleyball Team has followed the men’s program in announcing that they will welcome in Brazil this summer to play in the 2017 USA Volleyball Cup from August 27th-29th. The women’s teams will play in Anaheim a week after the American men welcome Brazil to Hoffman Estates, Illinois.

The United States is currently ranked #2 in the FIVB World Rankings, with Brazil sitting #4. The Americans took a bronze medal at the 2016 Olympic Games, while Brazil lost to eventual champions China in the quarterfinals in Rio.

“Brazil has built one of a handful of legendary programs in international volleyball, and this year’s USA Volleyball Cup matches will be a wonderful opportunity for American fans to see both programs live,” U.S. Women’s National Team Head Coach Karch Kiraly said. “Every time we square off across the net, it’s a battle – both teams test each other, and learn, and we cherish experiences like that. We’ll see you in August!”

The USA Volleyball Cup opening match will have first serve at 4 p.m. PT on Aug. 27, while the Aug. 29 match will start at 7:30 p.m. PT.

“Anaheim and the greater hospitality community is looking forward to welcoming Brazil to the heart of Southern California,” Sports Anaheim Vice President of Sports Development Roy Edmondson said. “The City of Anaheim is proud to watch two of the most prestigious women’s volleyball nations face head-to-head in the U.S. Women’s National Team’s home city, Anaheim.”

The two teams have played 24 times since 2011, with the Americans having a 14-10 advantage in that period. 6 of those matches have been in tournament gold medal m atches. Over a longer period, since 1983, Brazil has a decided advantage, leading 67-74.

After the USA Volleyball Cup, both teams will participate in the FIVB Grand Champions Cup in Japan from September 5th-10th, along with China, Russia, Japan, and South Korea.

The Grand Champions Cup is the summer’s primary global women’s championship at the senior level. The two teams will also face off at least once in the FIVB World Grand Prix in July – they’re scheduled to close pool play on July 23rd in Brazil.

This will be 4th edition of the women’s USA Volleyball Cup, which has been held every year since 2013, aside from last year (due to Olympic obligations). Brazil participated in the 2014 edition as well, with the Americans sweeping the series 4-0 with two games in Southern California and 2 games in Hawaii.

Americans’ official training start date is Monday, with some players reporting sooner or later based on their professional team schedules.

MLB Baseball live

MLB Baseball live

By NAILA-JEAN MEYERSAUG. 29, 2016
Continue reading the main story
Share This Page

Share
Tweet
Email
More
Save

Continue reading the main story
Photo
Phil Collins performed during the U.S. Open’s opening ceremony at Arthur Ashe Stadium. Credit Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

John Isner has only twice come back from losing the first two sets at a Grand Slam tournament.

The first time was at the 2013 French Open, when he prevailed in five sets against his fellow American Ryan Harrison, then 21.

On Monday, in the first round of the United States Open, Isner, 31, again found himself down two sets to none against a next-generation American. This time it was against the 18-year-old Frances Tiafoe, who served for the match in the fifth set before losing, 3-6, 4-6, 7-6 (5), 6-2, 7-6 (3).

Tiafoe, the son of immigrants from Sierra Leone, took up tennis because his father worked a maintenance job at a tennis center in College Park, Md. He developed into a top-ranked junior player and, at No. 125 in the ATP rankings, was playing only his third main-draw match at a Grand Slam tournament Monday. He was also seeking his first victory.

Tiafoe broke Isner’s formidable serve at love in Isner’s opening service game, then broke him two more times to build a two-set lead. Tiafoe had four break point opportunities in the third set but failed to convert.
Photo
John Isner during his match against Francis Tiafoe. Credit Christian Hansen for The New York Times

Both players fed off the crowd at the new Grandstand stadium, often encouraging cheers by raising their arms after big points. Chants of “Let’s go, Frances!” were frequent during changeovers, as fans sensed a changing-of-the-guard moment, with the underdog teenager pushing the 20th-seeded Isner, the highest-seeded American.
Continue reading the main story

Tiafoe broke Isner for the fourth time at 3-4 in the fifth set to gain a chance to serve for the match. But Isner’s experience kicked in. He broke right back to get back on serve and dominated the tiebreaker to clinch the win.

The players shared an exhausted hug at the net, and afterward Isner said: “It was an absolute pleasure to play against Frances. He’s a hell of a player and a class act.”

Experience also prevailed over youth in another all-American matchup, when No. 26 seed Jack Sock, 23, edged 18-year-old Taylor Fritz, 7-6 (3), 7-5, 3-6, 1-6, 6-4.

Read a complete article on the matches here.
Cruising Under an Open Roof
Continue reading the main story
Photo
Rafael Nadal serving during his match against Denis Istomin at Arthur Ashe Stadium. Credit Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

During a practice session last week, Rafael Nadal was the first professional player to hit a tennis ball at Arthur Ashe Stadium with its new retractable roof closed. He said he recorded it because “it was an important thing in the history of this tournament.”

There was no need to play under the closed roof Monday, a sunny and hot day at the U.S.T.A. Billie Jean King National Tennis Center.

For fans in Ashe Stadium, there was no roof in motion above and no drama on court below.

No. 7 seed Roberta Vinci, a surprise finalist last year, defeated Anna-Lena Friedsam, 6-2, 6-4, in 1 hour 9 minutes. Second-seeded Angelique Kerber won the first seven games against Polona Hercog in 33 minutes before Hercog retired because of an illness.

Nadal, who is working his way back from a wrist injury that caused him to withdraw from the French Open and Wimbledon, dispatched Denis Istomin, 6-1, 6-4, 6-2, in 2:07 to close out the day session.

Asked about his wrist in a postmatch interview, Nadal said: “The most important thing is I am here in New York. That makes me feel happy.”

When the night session began, the roof was closed, but as part of the opening ceremony, the roof reopened — to the sounds of Phil Collins singing “In the Air Tonight.”

There was some tension in the air during the match that followed. Top-ranked Novak Djokovic, who has also been struggling with a wrist injury since the Olympics, needed a visit from a trainer to work on his right arm midway through the first set against Jerzy Janowicz. He then dropped the second set, but he lost only three more games after that, claiming a 6-3, 5-7, 6-2, 6-1 victory.

He did not want to discuss his physical ailments much afterward, saying, “I’m glad to get through this day and let’s keep on moving.”

Instead he sang “I Can’t Dance” in a nod to Collins and peppered the crowd with praise, calling Ashe Stadium during the night sessions as his “light at the end of the tunnel.”

Read about how the roof was build here.

U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play live

U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play live

By NAILA-JEAN MEYERSAUG. 29, 2016
Continue reading the main story
Share This Page

Share
Tweet
Email
More
Save

Continue reading the main story
Photo
Phil Collins performed during the U.S. Open’s opening ceremony at Arthur Ashe Stadium. Credit Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

John Isner has only twice come back from losing the first two sets at a Grand Slam tournament.

The first time was at the 2013 French Open, when he prevailed in five sets against his fellow American Ryan Harrison, then 21.

On Monday, in the first round of the United States Open, Isner, 31, again found himself down two sets to none against a next-generation American. This time it was against the 18-year-old Frances Tiafoe, who served for the match in the fifth set before losing, 3-6, 4-6, 7-6 (5), 6-2, 7-6 (3).

Tiafoe, the son of immigrants from Sierra Leone, took up tennis because his father worked a maintenance job at a tennis center in College Park, Md. He developed into a top-ranked junior player and, at No. 125 in the ATP rankings, was playing only his third main-draw match at a Grand Slam tournament Monday. He was also seeking his first victory.

Tiafoe broke Isner’s formidable serve at love in Isner’s opening service game, then broke him two more times to build a two-set lead. Tiafoe had four break point opportunities in the third set but failed to convert.
Photo
John Isner during his match against Francis Tiafoe. Credit Christian Hansen for The New York Times

Both players fed off the crowd at the new Grandstand stadium, often encouraging cheers by raising their arms after big points. Chants of “Let’s go, Frances!” were frequent during changeovers, as fans sensed a changing-of-the-guard moment, with the underdog teenager pushing the 20th-seeded Isner, the highest-seeded American.
Continue reading the main story

Tiafoe broke Isner for the fourth time at 3-4 in the fifth set to gain a chance to serve for the match. But Isner’s experience kicked in. He broke right back to get back on serve and dominated the tiebreaker to clinch the win.

The players shared an exhausted hug at the net, and afterward Isner said: “It was an absolute pleasure to play against Frances. He’s a hell of a player and a class act.”

Experience also prevailed over youth in another all-American matchup, when No. 26 seed Jack Sock, 23, edged 18-year-old Taylor Fritz, 7-6 (3), 7-5, 3-6, 1-6, 6-4.

Read a complete article on the matches here.
Cruising Under an Open Roof
Continue reading the main story
Photo
Rafael Nadal serving during his match against Denis Istomin at Arthur Ashe Stadium. Credit Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

During a practice session last week, Rafael Nadal was the first professional player to hit a tennis ball at Arthur Ashe Stadium with its new retractable roof closed. He said he recorded it because “it was an important thing in the history of this tournament.”

There was no need to play under the closed roof Monday, a sunny and hot day at the U.S.T.A. Billie Jean King National Tennis Center.

For fans in Ashe Stadium, there was no roof in motion above and no drama on court below.

No. 7 seed Roberta Vinci, a surprise finalist last year, defeated Anna-Lena Friedsam, 6-2, 6-4, in 1 hour 9 minutes. Second-seeded Angelique Kerber won the first seven games against Polona Hercog in 33 minutes before Hercog retired because of an illness.

Nadal, who is working his way back from a wrist injury that caused him to withdraw from the French Open and Wimbledon, dispatched Denis Istomin, 6-1, 6-4, 6-2, in 2:07 to close out the day session.

Asked about his wrist in a postmatch interview, Nadal said: “The most important thing is I am here in New York. That makes me feel happy.”

When the night session began, the roof was closed, but as part of the opening ceremony, the roof reopened — to the sounds of Phil Collins singing “In the Air Tonight.”

There was some tension in the air during the match that followed. Top-ranked Novak Djokovic, who has also been struggling with a wrist injury since the Olympics, needed a visit from a trainer to work on his right arm midway through the first set against Jerzy Janowicz. He then dropped the second set, but he lost only three more games after that, claiming a 6-3, 5-7, 6-2, 6-1 victory.

He did not want to discuss his physical ailments much afterward, saying, “I’m glad to get through this day and let’s keep on moving.”

Instead he sang “I Can’t Dance” in a nod to Collins and peppered the crowd with praise, calling Ashe Stadium during the night sessions as his “light at the end of the tunnel.”

Read about how the roof was build here.

Racing Coast to Coast live

Racing Coast to Coast live

By NAILA-JEAN MEYERSAUG. 29, 2016
Continue reading the main story
Share This Page

Share
Tweet
Email
More
Save

Continue reading the main story
Photo
Phil Collins performed during the U.S. Open’s opening ceremony at Arthur Ashe Stadium. Credit Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

John Isner has only twice come back from losing the first two sets at a Grand Slam tournament.

The first time was at the 2013 French Open, when he prevailed in five sets against his fellow American Ryan Harrison, then 21.

On Monday, in the first round of the United States Open, Isner, 31, again found himself down two sets to none against a next-generation American. This time it was against the 18-year-old Frances Tiafoe, who served for the match in the fifth set before losing, 3-6, 4-6, 7-6 (5), 6-2, 7-6 (3).

Tiafoe, the son of immigrants from Sierra Leone, took up tennis because his father worked a maintenance job at a tennis center in College Park, Md. He developed into a top-ranked junior player and, at No. 125 in the ATP rankings, was playing only his third main-draw match at a Grand Slam tournament Monday. He was also seeking his first victory.

Tiafoe broke Isner’s formidable serve at love in Isner’s opening service game, then broke him two more times to build a two-set lead. Tiafoe had four break point opportunities in the third set but failed to convert.
Photo
John Isner during his match against Francis Tiafoe. Credit Christian Hansen for The New York Times

Both players fed off the crowd at the new Grandstand stadium, often encouraging cheers by raising their arms after big points. Chants of “Let’s go, Frances!” were frequent during changeovers, as fans sensed a changing-of-the-guard moment, with the underdog teenager pushing the 20th-seeded Isner, the highest-seeded American.
Continue reading the main story

Tiafoe broke Isner for the fourth time at 3-4 in the fifth set to gain a chance to serve for the match. But Isner’s experience kicked in. He broke right back to get back on serve and dominated the tiebreaker to clinch the win.

The players shared an exhausted hug at the net, and afterward Isner said: “It was an absolute pleasure to play against Frances. He’s a hell of a player and a class act.”

Experience also prevailed over youth in another all-American matchup, when No. 26 seed Jack Sock, 23, edged 18-year-old Taylor Fritz, 7-6 (3), 7-5, 3-6, 1-6, 6-4.

Read a complete article on the matches here.
Cruising Under an Open Roof
Continue reading the main story
Photo
Rafael Nadal serving during his match against Denis Istomin at Arthur Ashe Stadium. Credit Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

During a practice session last week, Rafael Nadal was the first professional player to hit a tennis ball at Arthur Ashe Stadium with its new retractable roof closed. He said he recorded it because “it was an important thing in the history of this tournament.”

There was no need to play under the closed roof Monday, a sunny and hot day at the U.S.T.A. Billie Jean King National Tennis Center.

For fans in Ashe Stadium, there was no roof in motion above and no drama on court below.

No. 7 seed Roberta Vinci, a surprise finalist last year, defeated Anna-Lena Friedsam, 6-2, 6-4, in 1 hour 9 minutes. Second-seeded Angelique Kerber won the first seven games against Polona Hercog in 33 minutes before Hercog retired because of an illness.

Nadal, who is working his way back from a wrist injury that caused him to withdraw from the French Open and Wimbledon, dispatched Denis Istomin, 6-1, 6-4, 6-2, in 2:07 to close out the day session.

Asked about his wrist in a postmatch interview, Nadal said: “The most important thing is I am here in New York. That makes me feel happy.”

When the night session began, the roof was closed, but as part of the opening ceremony, the roof reopened — to the sounds of Phil Collins singing “In the Air Tonight.”

There was some tension in the air during the match that followed. Top-ranked Novak Djokovic, who has also been struggling with a wrist injury since the Olympics, needed a visit from a trainer to work on his right arm midway through the first set against Jerzy Janowicz. He then dropped the second set, but he lost only three more games after that, claiming a 6-3, 5-7, 6-2, 6-1 victory.

He did not want to discuss his physical ailments much afterward, saying, “I’m glad to get through this day and let’s keep on moving.”

Instead he sang “I Can’t Dance” in a nod to Collins and peppered the crowd with praise, calling Ashe Stadium during the night sessions as his “light at the end of the tunnel.”

Read about how the roof was build here.

U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play live

U.S. Open Tennis: First-round play live

By NAILA-JEAN MEYERSAUG. 29, 2016
Continue reading the main story
Share This Page

Share
Tweet
Email
More
Save

Continue reading the main story
Photo
Phil Collins performed during the U.S. Open’s opening ceremony at Arthur Ashe Stadium. Credit Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

John Isner has only twice come back from losing the first two sets at a Grand Slam tournament.

The first time was at the 2013 French Open, when he prevailed in five sets against his fellow American Ryan Harrison, then 21.

On Monday, in the first round of the United States Open, Isner, 31, again found himself down two sets to none against a next-generation American. This time it was against the 18-year-old Frances Tiafoe, who served for the match in the fifth set before losing, 3-6, 4-6, 7-6 (5), 6-2, 7-6 (3).

Tiafoe, the son of immigrants from Sierra Leone, took up tennis because his father worked a maintenance job at a tennis center in College Park, Md. He developed into a top-ranked junior player and, at No. 125 in the ATP rankings, was playing only his third main-draw match at a Grand Slam tournament Monday. He was also seeking his first victory.

Tiafoe broke Isner’s formidable serve at love in Isner’s opening service game, then broke him two more times to build a two-set lead. Tiafoe had four break point opportunities in the third set but failed to convert.
Photo
John Isner during his match against Francis Tiafoe. Credit Christian Hansen for The New York Times

Both players fed off the crowd at the new Grandstand stadium, often encouraging cheers by raising their arms after big points. Chants of “Let’s go, Frances!” were frequent during changeovers, as fans sensed a changing-of-the-guard moment, with the underdog teenager pushing the 20th-seeded Isner, the highest-seeded American.
Continue reading the main story

Tiafoe broke Isner for the fourth time at 3-4 in the fifth set to gain a chance to serve for the match. But Isner’s experience kicked in. He broke right back to get back on serve and dominated the tiebreaker to clinch the win.

The players shared an exhausted hug at the net, and afterward Isner said: “It was an absolute pleasure to play against Frances. He’s a hell of a player and a class act.”

Experience also prevailed over youth in another all-American matchup, when No. 26 seed Jack Sock, 23, edged 18-year-old Taylor Fritz, 7-6 (3), 7-5, 3-6, 1-6, 6-4.

Read a complete article on the matches here.
Cruising Under an Open Roof
Continue reading the main story
Photo
Rafael Nadal serving during his match against Denis Istomin at Arthur Ashe Stadium. Credit Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

During a practice session last week, Rafael Nadal was the first professional player to hit a tennis ball at Arthur Ashe Stadium with its new retractable roof closed. He said he recorded it because “it was an important thing in the history of this tournament.”

There was no need to play under the closed roof Monday, a sunny and hot day at the U.S.T.A. Billie Jean King National Tennis Center.

For fans in Ashe Stadium, there was no roof in motion above and no drama on court below.

No. 7 seed Roberta Vinci, a surprise finalist last year, defeated Anna-Lena Friedsam, 6-2, 6-4, in 1 hour 9 minutes. Second-seeded Angelique Kerber won the first seven games against Polona Hercog in 33 minutes before Hercog retired because of an illness.

Nadal, who is working his way back from a wrist injury that caused him to withdraw from the French Open and Wimbledon, dispatched Denis Istomin, 6-1, 6-4, 6-2, in 2:07 to close out the day session.

Asked about his wrist in a postmatch interview, Nadal said: “The most important thing is I am here in New York. That makes me feel happy.”

When the night session began, the roof was closed, but as part of the opening ceremony, the roof reopened — to the sounds of Phil Collins singing “In the Air Tonight.”

There was some tension in the air during the match that followed. Top-ranked Novak Djokovic, who has also been struggling with a wrist injury since the Olympics, needed a visit from a trainer to work on his right arm midway through the first set against Jerzy Janowicz. He then dropped the second set, but he lost only three more games after that, claiming a 6-3, 5-7, 6-2, 6-1 victory.

He did not want to discuss his physical ailments much afterward, saying, “I’m glad to get through this day and let’s keep on moving.”

Instead he sang “I Can’t Dance” in a nod to Collins and peppered the crowd with praise, calling Ashe Stadium during the night sessions as his “light at the end of the tunnel.”

Read about how the roof was build here.